Thom McAn Bootmaster

Thom McAn Bootmaster Longwings

More vintage. This time its Thom McAn shoes likely from the late 1960s or 1970s.

Thom McAn Bootmaster 4105 Black

According to Wikipedia, Thom McAn was a retail shoe giant in the United States during 1960s and 1970s. The “Bootmaster” line was a premium line for their stores. I kind of remember Thom McAn in the 1980s when I worked at a mall in San Diego. I don’t remember wanting their shoes. I liked Vans. But that was then.

Thom McAn Bootmaster Wingtip

The shoes are well built. They have a thick single leather sole, storm welt, leather heel and are fully leather lined. I would rate them lower than Alden and a Florsheim Imperial in construction but they are still a very fine shoe.

Thom McAn Bootmaster Longwing LWB

When I first saw the shoes, they reminded me of Nettleton longwings due to the heavy broguing and the plug in the heel. Then I noticed the small hole in the heel counter. Almost all Nettleton’s have this hole. So maybe Nettleton manufactured these shoes for Thom McAn. Or they could be a copy of Nettleton’s design. Maybe Thom McAn was the Sketchers of 1970. Or I could be entirely wrong. It happens.

Vintage Thom McAn Bootmaster Nettleton

Vintage Black Thom McAn Bootmaster

There is no size information in the shoe. I did a Google search and found a few other Bootmaster pairs and they were also missing the size. Why would you not mark your shoes with size? I don’t know. Maybe there was sticker on the shoe at one point.

[***The size is described below in the comments***]

The old english gothic “Bootmaster” logo is pretty cool but the “Bootmaster” name seems like an odd marketing name for your premium dress shoes. But there are lots of things I don’t understand. Like teenage girls. And magnets.

I haven’t worn them yet so I can’t comment on their wearability.
Enjoy the photos.

Thom McAn Bootmaster Longwing Blucher

Vintage Thom McAn Bootmaster

Thom McAn Bootmaster Wingtip

3 thoughts on “Thom McAn Bootmaster Longwings”

  1. These shoes actually do have the size marked inside. Older shoes often display the code in a three or four digit “code”. Here, that code is 4105. The first number, 4 is the width. 1=A, 2=B, 3=C, 4=D, 5=E, etc. The 105 is the size, 10.5. 100 would be a 10, 95 a 9.5, etc. So, these are a 10.5D.

    1. Thank you so much! I came into four pair of vintage boots brand new in the box and the only size was 4105. I have been looking everywhere for the answer!

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